Trophy hunting of lions should not be mistaken for conservation

Home»Newsroom»News»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Lions are being hunted under the guise of education and conservation, threatening their numbers in the wild.    Trophy hunters lead people to believe that a lion’s value will increase in order to influence rural communities to conserve the big cats. This is a misconception, as there is no scientific proof backing this practice. There are around 1,800 huntable male lions in Africa, and trophy hunting claims an unsustainable 665 of them per year. Trophy hunting hasn’t proven itself a sustainable venture. It also features several harmful facets, such as bating lions out of protected areas, exceeding the quota and destroying prides’ males. As a result, young males are removed from the possibility of reproduction.     CELEBRATE WORLD LION DAY WITH US ON AUGUST 10!    LION FACTS There are approximately 20,000 lions left in the wild, down from 200,000 in 1960 They have lost 90 percent of their historical range Nearly 1,500 lion skeletons a year are exported from South African lion farms — the site of canned hunting There is not enough scientific data to prove that the legal trade of lion bones is offsetting and discouraging the illegal poaching of wild lions. In some cases, this makes the illegal poaching of wild lions more lucrative. South Africa has about 8,000 captive lions from 250 captive breeding facilities Sources: //lionalert.org/page/trophy-hunting //www.livescience.com/41572-male-lion-survival.html Facebook Twitter...

Four big cat residents get life-enhancing dental procedures

Home»Newsroom»News»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Life just got a little less painful for four residents at Carolina Tiger Rescue. A team from the Peter Emily International Veterinary Dental Foundation visited our sanctuary last weekend to perform life-enhancing dental procedures on Sebastian Lion and Saber, Shenandoah and Tio Tigers. During the two-day mission for the Colorado-based nonprofit, doctors provided 14 root canals, four gingivoplasties, and one extraction. A gingivoplasty is a procedure to reshape gums. Enclosure mates Saber, 7, and Shenandoah, 15, got root canals on each of their four canines. Sebastian, 16, got an extraction and three root canals; Tio, 16, also got three root canals. Tio will need more work in the future.   Doctors from the Peter Emily International Veterinary Dental Foundation work on root canals for Sebastian Lion.  Sebastian Lion   Tio Tiger Tio Tiger Saber and Shenandoah were bred out of profit; all four canines on both big cats were broken off, likely for entertainment purposes. Saber, our lone white tiger, was owned by a magician in Vegas when he was a cub. The two were probably a breeding pair at their former facility in Colorado, so we neutered Saber upon arrival. Sebastian and Tio had several fractured teeth. Our animal care team noticed the poor condition of Tio’s teeth during his intake exam upon his May rescue. Keepers got a closer look at Sebastian’s teeth during a recent physical on the mellow lion. Check out this story on last weekend’s dental procedures! //t.co/Bn8bRS21Qu...

How we clear the sanctuary for safety each morning

Home»Newsroom»News»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   The first step every morning for Carolina Tiger Rescue animal keepers is to clear the sanctuary. One of our skilled keepers will drive around the sanctuary in an closed vehicle to check the health and safety statuses of the big and medium residents. Once complete, the staff will hear the “Sanctuary Safe” call over the radios. Watch Keeper Lauren clear the sanctuary! Facebook Twitter Instagram...

International Tiger Day 2018

Home»Newsroom»News» [/et_pb_sidebar]   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Join Carolina Tiger Rescue as we Celebrate International Tiger Day  July 29, 2018 International Tiger Day was first celebrated in 2010 in response to the shocking news that 97 percent of all wild tigers had disappeared in the last century, with only around 3,000 left alive in the wild. Tigers are on the brink of extinction, and International Tiger Day aims to bring attention to this fact in order to halt their decline. During the entire month of July, Carolina Tiger Rescue is celebrating International Tiger Day!  From raising awareness with feature stories to our Second Annual Summer Pawction to our Rescue to Refuge Match Day where we will be raising money to complete the second run for our Quarantine Building! Please, join us as we celebrate tigers everywhere! Scroll down to learn more about some of the problems facing tigers and find some tips on what individuals can do to help.   International Tiger Day at Carolina Tiger Rescue Summer Pawction:  Want to find some great deals and help the tigers at the same time?  Join Carolina Tiger Rescue’sSummer Pawction (auction) for lots of fun auction items! 50/50 Raffle:  Feeling Lucky? Support the tigers and try your luck! Purchase 1 raffle ticket for $5; 5 tickets for $20 or 15 tickets for $50.  One lucky winner will go home with 50% of all ticket sales and 50% will support the tigers at Carolina Tiger Rescue! Paw to Make a Difference: Make a donation of...

International Tiger Day 2018: The rescue story of the Virginia Girls

Home»Newsroom»News»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   The manure was high enough to reach their shoulders. The trailer they were living in was far too small for three full-grown, female Siberian tigers. When they were rescued from their crowded living conditions, they were hungry. They were on edge. These big cats were also very grumpy, understandably so. State officials in Virginia found the trio in a small, manure-filled cattle trailer during a raid in August 1995. The tigers were meant to be sold. Officials sent the trio to us when we were still known as Carnivore Preservation Trust, and they lived in peace.   Celebrate International Tiger Day with us on July 29! The last Virginia Girl lived at Carolina Tiger Rescue until 2007.  When they arrived, they were in poor shape. Manassas and Shiloh Tigers weighed only 180 pounds; the largest tiger of the trio, Antietam, was a scrawny 200 pounds. They ate their way to a healthy 280 and 400 pounds in a few months at the rescue. Tigers can weigh between 300 and 700 pounds.  The Virginia Girls, as we came to know them, seemed to enjoy their spacious enclosure. They were playful and even “talked” to their neighboring residents. They remained at our sanctuary until their respective passings in 2003, 2006, and 2007. More than a decade after the last Virginia Girl lived here, there are still many other tigers in need of rescue. In more than four decades, Carolina Tiger Rescue has provided forever homes...

International Tiger Day 2018: Global brands are standing up for tigers

Home»Newsroom»News»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Notice the decline of tiger selfies on dating app Tinder? Yep, that was a thing. What about the advisory screen when you search for certain wildlife-related hashtags on Instagram? Or the fact that you can’t purchase tickets for experiences that exploit wild animals on TripAdvisor? Global brands are doing their part to protect animals and educate others about the changes they can make to impact wildlife, too. Last month, USC-Aiken banned animal circuses, joining more than 600 venues and communities across the nation that have stood up for animals in entertainment. This is what advocacy is about, and we recognize the actions of these companies and communities as a step in a positive direction.  Tinder users were posting selfies with tigers to attract more dates. In July 2017, Tinder wrote a blog urging its users to remove tiger selfies and created the hashtag #NoTigerSelfies. “More often than not, these photos take advantage of beautiful creatures that have been torn from their natural environment,” read part of Tinder’s issued statement. “Wild animals deserve to live in the wild.”   Carolina Tiger Rescue is celebrating International Tiger Day! Join our efforts to #savethetigers!  Carolina Tiger Rescue’s core values couldn’t agree more with Tinder’s statement on tiger selfies, as we believe these wild cats should live in their native habitats. Tinder, which pledged $10,000 to Project Cat to honor last year’s International Tiger Day, mentioned that the tigers could unfortunately be drugged for photo opportunities. This is...