How we clear the sanctuary for safety each morning

Home»Newsroom»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   The first step every morning for Carolina Tiger Rescue animal keepers is to clear the sanctuary. One of our skilled keepers will drive around the sanctuary in an closed vehicle to check the health and safety statuses of the big and medium residents. Once complete, the staff will hear the “Sanctuary Safe” call over the radios. Watch Keeper Lauren clear the sanctuary! Facebook Twitter Instagram...

International Tiger Day 2018

Home»Newsroom» [/et_pb_sidebar]   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Join Carolina Tiger Rescue as we Celebrate International Tiger Day  July 29, 2018 International Tiger Day was first celebrated in 2010 in response to the shocking news that 97 percent of all wild tigers had disappeared in the last century, with only around 3,000 left alive in the wild. Tigers are on the brink of extinction, and International Tiger Day aims to bring attention to this fact in order to halt their decline. During the entire month of July, Carolina Tiger Rescue is celebrating International Tiger Day!  From raising awareness with feature stories to our Second Annual Summer Pawction to our Rescue to Refuge Match Day where we will be raising money to complete the second run for our Quarantine Building! Please, join us as we celebrate tigers everywhere! Scroll down to learn more about some of the problems facing tigers and find some tips on what individuals can do to help.   International Tiger Day at Carolina Tiger Rescue Summer Pawction:  Want to find some great deals and help the tigers at the same time?  Join Carolina Tiger Rescue’sSummer Pawction (auction) for lots of fun auction items! 50/50 Raffle:  Feeling Lucky? Support the tigers and try your luck! Purchase 1 raffle ticket for $5; 5 tickets for $20 or 15 tickets for $50.  One lucky winner will go home with 50% of all ticket sales and 50% will support the tigers at Carolina Tiger Rescue! Paw to Make a Difference: Make a donation of...

International Tiger Day 2018: Global brands are standing up for tigers

Home»Newsroom»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Notice the decline of tiger selfies on dating app Tinder? Yep, that was a thing. What about the advisory screen when you search for certain wildlife-related hashtags on Instagram? Or the fact that you can’t purchase tickets for experiences that exploit wild animals on TripAdvisor? Global brands are doing their part to protect animals and educate others about the changes they can make to impact wildlife, too. Last month, USC-Aiken banned animal circuses, joining more than 600 venues and communities across the nation that have stood up for animals in entertainment. This is what advocacy is about, and we recognize the actions of these companies and communities as a step in a positive direction.  Tinder users were posting selfies with tigers to attract more dates. In July 2017, Tinder wrote a blog urging its users to remove tiger selfies and created the hashtag #NoTigerSelfies. “More often than not, these photos take advantage of beautiful creatures that have been torn from their natural environment,” read part of Tinder’s issued statement. “Wild animals deserve to live in the wild.”   Carolina Tiger Rescue is celebrating International Tiger Day! Join our efforts to #savethetigers!  Carolina Tiger Rescue’s core values couldn’t agree more with Tinder’s statement on tiger selfies, as we believe these wild cats should live in their native habitats. Tinder, which pledged $10,000 to Project Cat to honor last year’s International Tiger Day, mentioned that the tigers could unfortunately be drugged for photo opportunities. This is...

International Tiger Day 2018: Why education drives who we are

Home»Newsroom» [/et_pb_sidebar]   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Something unique happens when you visit Carolina Tiger Rescue. Guests stand just feet away from several beautiful tigers. This experience isn’t only meant for the public to see animals — its purpose is to learn why we do what we do for them. We want you to put the face to the story. We want you to leave Carolina Tiger Rescue knowing what you can do to help tigers like Emerson, who started his life as a pet, or Rajah, who was found wandering on the side of rural road as a cub. There is currently no legislation in the state of North Carolina that bans people from owning tigers, an endangered species in the wild. Estimates indicate there are about 3,800 wild tigers left. That number more than doubles for them in captivity. Most captive tigers don’t get to enjoy their lives at federally-accredited sanctuaries like Carolina Tiger Rescue, though. Many are exploited. When they can no longer be used, some of these animals are sadly euthanized.  Carolina Tiger Rescue is celebrating International Tiger Day to take part in the global recognition of the plights tigers face.  The population of wild tigers has dropped severely over the last century due to principal threats, such as habitat loss and poaching.  An integral part of our mission is education, because teaching others the truth about what is happening to the tigers in the wild and in captivity is one way to save and protect...

Special experiences at the rescue!

Home»Newsroom»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   Carolina Tiger Rescue folds education into every experience we offer. Though tours are a popular option for visitors to experience the sanctuary, there are many other ways to connect and learn with us. Here’s how:    VOLUNTEER Animal care is our most sought-after volunteer position. We have one volunteer who drives from Ohio each month to complete her hours. Heather, who initially volunteered at a facility in Ohio, found Carolina Tiger Rescue about a year ago. She fell in love with our culture and values, so much so that she takes the seven-hour trip each month!  INTERN The interns are here, and they are rocking it! We extended our internship program for the duration of the summer this year. Our interns learn how to properly care for the residents and leave knowing how to care for animals and be able to discuss the issues they face! CAMP! Summer camp is now in session! Camps are great educational opportunities for children. We offer full-week camp for elementary and middle school children. This year, we’ve added a high school camp for older children after we could no longer deny the demand for it! Campers get to learn how to be a wildcat veterinarian, practice wildlife biology skills, and help some of the tigers express their creativity through painting!     Facebook Twitter Instagram...

International Tiger Day 2018: Our work with WildTrack

Home»Newsroom»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   By Dawn Friedel  Carolina Tiger Rescue adoptive parent and volunteer As a frequent visitor of Carolina Tiger Rescue who has become an adoptive parent and enjoys teaching others about the animals here, I understand the organization’s mission first-hand. After one visit, it’s clear how Carolina Tiger Rescue helps captive wild cats. What may not be as transparent is how the rescue also helps those in the wild. Through Carolina Tiger Rescue, I learned about another non-profit organization founded by Zoe Jewell and Sky Alibhai known as WildTrack, whose mission is to improve the monitoring of endangered species to help relieve human-wildlife conflict and counter-poaching. What does one have to do with the other? The animals, specifically the tigers, are the common thread. WildTrack, which uses non-evasive research to monitor wildlife, has been working with Carolina Tiger Rescue for several years to build a database of tiger footprints. They currently have prints from more than 20 animals, which are the foundation for their software called FIT (Footprint Identification Technology). By collecting prints, they have been able to extract algorithms to identify tigers. They can determine the subspecies, age, sex, and individual animal all from an image of their footprint. To collect the prints, WildTrack works with Carolina Tiger Rescue keepers to ensure safety for the animals and the people involved. The keepers select the animal most receptive to the process, often tigers who don’t mind people or who are more food-motivated. The tiger is...