Carolina is a very confident tiger who enjoys greeting visitors with her moans and chuffles.  She loves the spotlight and will almost always come up to visit when people are out and about.  She also loves to sun herself on top of one of the platforms in her enclosure.

Born March 4, 2010

Rescued October 11, 2016

How Carolina Came to the Sanctuary

Carolina came to Carolina Tiger Rescue with her enclosure-mates, Caprichio and India, along with 13 other animals from a facility in Colorado.  The owner became ill and decided to sell his land and donate his animals.  Carolina Tiger Rescue worked with several other sanctuaries around the country to find homes for over 100 animals.  This is the largest rescue in Carolina Tiger Rescue's history and the largest rescue of big cats in the United States.

Personality

Carolina is a very social tiger who enjoys visiting with guests.  She is often the first to come up to the fence when someone walks by.  She is always good for a chuffle or tiger moan, which sounds like a cow mooing.  Between her and India, Carolina is the more dominant tiger.  She always makes sure that India knows that she is the first to eat and the first to enjoy enrichment by giving her a growl or two.

Description

Carolina has a much lighter coat than her enclosure-mates, India and Caprichio.  Her stripes are also much lighter and she has a lot of fluff around her face.

Where in Sanctuary

Carolina lives on tour on Oak Hill with Caprichio and India Tigers. On one side is Rajah Tiger and on the other side are Sebastian and Sheba Lions.

Habitat Destruction

It is estimated that 1/3 of all land mammals will risk extinction by the year 2050 if the current trend continues.  These animals are losing their habitats at an alarming rate.  On average, 300 football fields' worth of rainforest is cleared each hour for palm oil plantations.  Palm oil is an easy and cheap crop to grow that is in over 50% of consumer goods.  The area in which palm oil is planted is home to tigers, orangutans, and countless other species, big and small, that are vital to the Earth’s well-being.

Panthera tigris