Sam Ocelot

Sam Ocelot

Home»Uncategorized» 2010-08-29 Sam (10)Archive Sam (4)2005-02-06 Sam (4)2005-02-06 Sam (6)2005-02-06 Sam (7)Sam Ocelot2005-02-06 Sam (7) Born September 10, 2000 Born at Carolina Tiger Rescue Passed away January 21, 2018 Sam’s Story Sam was born here at Carolina Tiger Rescue when we were still a breeding facility for endangered and threatened small cats. From the very moment he came into this world, Sam was going to be his own ocelot. He did not seek out attention from his care takers. He showed no interest in being part of a tour. He was most content to sit up in his tree and watch the world go by. Almost every picture we have of Sam he is up in his tree. While he loved enrichment and eating (sometimes taking advantage of unsuspecting wildlife!), he in general preferred to be left alone. While that may not seem overly inviting, I always appreciated how much of a wild ocelot Sam really was. Most of our animals would never do well in the wild. For starters, they have become too accustom to humans and would have to learn how to hunt. Sam, on the other hand, would probably have figured it out pretty quickly. Sam may not have been the most well-known ocelot at Carolina Tiger Rescue but he stole the hearts of those who did know him.  Sam’s Passing January 21, 2018 Sam’s last blood work left us concerned about his kidneys. The elevated levels indicated that he was starting into kidney failure. Kidney failure is a tricky disease for our wild cats. The ideal way to treat kidney failure is through administering fluids...

Caracals

Home»Uncategorized»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   In Africa, Caracals are known as “Little Lions” due to their fierce and spunky demeanor. They pack a big punch in their small bodies! Caracals stand out in the feline family due to many interesting characteristics. Caracals sport long tufts of hair on their ears,  are excellent jumpers considering their body size, and are extremely strong! Caracals are capable of taking down prey three times their size! The long tufts of hair on the caracal’s ears are somewhat of a mystery, but scientists have a couple theories. One is to actually attract birds, their favorite prey. They sit in the tall grasses and flick the tops of their ears, fooling birds into thinking they are insects, causing them to come down closer, making them easier to catch! Caracals are considered crepuscular, meaning they are most active at dawn and dusk.   Caracals are excellent jumpers and can jump up to 13 feet in the air! Wild Caracals Though caracals are not considered endangered, their numbers are decreasing due to habitat loss. Caracals are sometimes poached by farmers if they are thought to have killed livestock. Caracal is a Turkish word meaning “Black-Eared.” Caracals love hunting guinea foul, a ground dwelling bird that makes easy prey for the cats. Learn More Caracals are considered small cats for many reasons: they purr instead of roar, they have larger back legs than front legs to help them make high leaps. Caracals help keep down the rodent and...
Millhouse Serval

Millhouse Serval

Home»Uncategorized» 2017-1122 Millhouse (1)2017-1122 Millhouse (2)2017-1122 Millhouse (10)2017-1122 Millhouse (21)2013-03-13 Millhouse (29)2014-01-29 Snow Millhouse (76)2013-10-11 Millhouse (38)2013-03-13 Millhouse (29)2013-03-13 Millhouse (27)2010-04-10 Millhouse2010-11-18 Millhouse (10)2010-11-18 Millhouse (9)2008-08-22 Millhouse (3)2008-08-22 Millhouse (2) Born September 17, 1996 Arrived on February 12, 1997 Passed away December 28, 2017 Millhouse’s Story Millhouse was born at Hexagon Farm in Buena Vista, California in 1996. He came to live at Carolina Tiger Rescue in 1997, on loan from Opryland, as part of our former breeding program. Millhouse was known by many as kind of a cranky old man. He was quick to give a hiss when you came to visit. But bringing a favorite treat might help you become friends. Of course he kept you on your toes about what that favorite treat might be! He always found the best sunny spots to nap in, particularly on those cold but sunny days. Even though his personality may not have always been the warmest, he did hold a special place in many hearts.  Millhouse’s Passing December 28, 2017 This week we had to say goodbye to one of our oldest residents, Millhouse Serval. Millhouse turned 21 this year, and though we were incredibly impressed with how well he was doing, we knew that we needed to keep a close eye on his health.  A few weeks ago he began to leave food behind. We were concerned about kidney failure but also noticed a sudden swelling on his jaw. We knew we had to anesthetize him for a possible tooth abscess. Sure enough, there was a tooth that had to be removed. Remarkably, he did really well through the...
Cheetah

Cheetah

Home»Uncategorized» Cheetahs are the fastest land animal. They are known for their great speeds even if they are for only short bursts of time. Cheetahs can run up to 70 miles per hour to catch their prey. There are five subspecies of cheetahs which include the Asiatic cheetah, Northwest African cheetah, South African cheetah, Sudan cheetah, and Tanzanian cheetah. IdentificationHistory Lifespan Cheetahs, on average, live between 8 and 10 years in the wild and between 10 and 12 years in captivity. There are a few documented cases of captive cheetahs living to be 20 years old. Shape & Size Cheetahs have long slender bodies with a deep chest. They are typically about 3 feet tall at the shoulder and can weigh between 110-140 pounds. Color Pattern Cheetahs have a yellow or golden coat with solid black spots. Behavior Cheetahs are typically solitary animals, however at times males will form coalitions of two or three brothers from the same litter. Females are solitary unless they are raising a litter of cubs. Habitat Cheetahs hunt mainly on the open or mostly open savanna and plains of Africa and Asia. They use the tall grasses to their advantage, to help camouflage them from their prey. Principal Threats Cheetah’s numbers if the last couple decades have declined dramatically due to habitat loss and mostly poaching. Cheetah fur brings in a lot of money on the black market. Acinonyx jubatus Range Map Range Cheetahs are most prevalent in Africa but only inhabit about 6% of their original range. There is a small population of about 200 cheetahs in Iran and then a few in...
Jaguar

Jaguar

Home»Uncategorized» Jaguars are the largest cat in the “America’s”. They are a “Big Cat” because they can roar, have round pupils, and their front legs are more muscular and stronger than their back legs. Jaguars are an apex predator, meaning there is nothing in their habitat that preys on them, they are also keystone species in that they help keep prey populations at a balanced level. IdentificationHistory Lifespan On average, jaguars typically live between 8 and 10 years in the wild, in captivity they can live up to 20 years of age. Shape & Size Jaguars are typically between 3.5 and 6 feet long and can weigh between 79 and 210 pounds, though there are records of male jaguars weighing as much as 350 pounds. Color Pattern Jaguars typically have a yellow coat with black or deep brown spots that are called rosettes. These spots are often open with an additional spot in the middle. Behavior Jaguars are solitary animals that only come together during mating season. Although jaguars are capable of hunting from trees they do most of their hunting on the ground. Jaguars are stealthy hunters with an extremely strong bite force and can crush their prey’s skull. Jaguars are great swimmers and spends a great deal of time in and around water and can even hunt from the water. Habitat Jaguars live in a wide variety of habitats including deciduous forests, swamps, rainforests, grasslands and mountain areas. Principal Threats The jaguars principal threat is human encroachment and habitat loss. Jaguars are also hunted for their pelt and are sometimes victims of retaliatory killings at the hands...