Toby Bobcat

Toby Bobcat

Home»Uncategorized» toby 1-18-18 (5)2018-0130 Toby (2)2018-0130 Toby (14)2018-0130 Toby (16)toby 1-18-18 (1)toby 1-18-18 (4)toby 1-18-18 (5)toby 1-18-18 (6)toby 1-18-18 (8)toby 1-18-18 (9)2017-1106 Toby (3)2017-1106 Toby (1)2017-1106 Toby (3)2017-1106 Toby (8)12-21-16 Toby (3)12-21-16 Toby (1)12-21-16 Toby (1)12-21-16 Toby (3) Born August 1, 2013 Rescued December 11, 2016 Passed away May 8, 2018 Toby’s Story Toby came to Carolina Tiger Rescue in December of 2016 from a facility in Colorado.  This facility was closed due when the owner fell ill.  Carolina Tiger Rescue worked with several other sanctuaries from around the country to find homes for over 100 animals. Toby was one of two bobcats rescued from this facility. Toby was always shyer and reserved than Talon Bobcat. Toby enjoyed his quiet days away from the tour path where he could watch the happenings of the sanctuary from his favorite tall platform. Toby’s Passing May 9, 2018 Last Tuesday, keepers noticed a wound on Toby Bobcat’s eye. It appeared to be an abscess on the outside of his left eye. We started him on antibiotics, and he appeared to do well the next couple of days.  On Saturday, keepers reported that he was looking pretty puny. Dr. Angela Lassiter immobilized him to perform a physical, giving us a closer look at his eye. His eyelids were very swollen. We flushed out the abscess and left a small incision allowing it to drain. We also found that he was running a pretty significant fever. We gave him medication to try to make him feel better, so that we could continue treating him with oral medications.  On Sunday, Toby continued to feel poorly....
Bandit Caracal

Bandit Caracal

Home»Uncategorized» 2010-11-18 Jellybean (34) crop2002-06 Jellybean (01)2011-11-06 Jellybean (18)2004-10 Jelly (01)2005-01-02 Jellybean (2)2005-01-02 Jellybean (16)2005-04-10 Jellybean (24)2006-04-30 Jelly Bean2008-04 Jellybean (01)2008-04 Jellybean (2)2009-04-04 Jellybean (01)2010-11-18 Jellybean (32)2010-11-18 Jellybean (34) crop2005-02 Jellybean   Born July 16, 2000     Born at Carolina Tiger Rescue     Passed away April 6, 2018    Bandit’s Story     Bandit was born at Carolina Tiger Rescue as part of our former breeding program.  Bandit was often the first cat on tour that guests see; he enjoyed sneaking up beside his den box through the tall grass, often seeing the tour guests long before they see him. Bandit was unlike most caracals in that he had an extremely laid back attitude and not much got him riled up. He was always happy to see his favorite keepers though, especially if they had food for him.      Bandit’s Passing     April 12, 2018-From out Curator: A few weeks ago, Bandit showed signs of an ear infection. We tried treating it with ear drops, which seemed to work for a bit, but it came back. We anesthetized him to do a thorough ear cleaning and were able to remove a polyp that was the root cause of the infection. That all went beautifully, but we learned through blood work that he was in the end stages of kidney failure.   We knew that we had very limited time with him and were watching him for any signs of distress. We started giving him medications to make him more comfortable and subcutaneous fluids to help support his kidneys. While we were able to give him subcutaneous...

Tigers

Home»Uncategorized»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   In the last 50 years the wild tiger population has dropped from 45,000 individuals to just 3,800 today. If the current trend continues, tigers could extinct in the wild by the year 2022. Less than 100 years ago 9 subspecies of tigers roamed the far east, including Russia, China, Indonesia, India, Korea, and all the land in between. Poaching and habitat loss, however, wiped out the Caspian, Javan, and Bali subspecies who were all once found in Indonesia. The South China Tiger is considered functionally extinct. Though a few remain in zoos, one has not been spotted in the wild in the last 25 years. Tigers have always been admired and feared by humans, which has led to their decline. As the human population increases, so does the demand for tigers natural habitat, its resources, and unfortunately also its parts. In some cultures, the entirety of a tiger’s body can be sold off, making the seller over $60,000. With the loss of the tiger though, comes the loss of thousands of other species of flora and fauna living in the same areas. Unfortunately the fate of tigers in the United States is not much better. There are an estimated 10,000 tigers in the United States and only 6-7% of them are in accredited facilities. The rest are in the hands of private owners, roadside zoos, or the entertainment industry. It is estimated that there are more tigers in the state of Texas than...
Sam Ocelot

Sam Ocelot

Home»Uncategorized» 2010-08-29 Sam (10)Archive Sam (4)2005-02-06 Sam (4)2005-02-06 Sam (6)2005-02-06 Sam (7)Sam Ocelot2005-02-06 Sam (7) Born September 10, 2000 Born at Carolina Tiger Rescue Passed away January 21, 2018 Sam’s Story Sam was born here at Carolina Tiger Rescue when we were still a breeding facility for endangered and threatened small cats. From the very moment he came into this world, Sam was going to be his own ocelot. He did not seek out attention from his care takers. He showed no interest in being part of a tour. He was most content to sit up in his tree and watch the world go by. Almost every picture we have of Sam he is up in his tree. While he loved enrichment and eating (sometimes taking advantage of unsuspecting wildlife!), he in general preferred to be left alone. While that may not seem overly inviting, I always appreciated how much of a wild ocelot Sam really was. Most of our animals would never do well in the wild. For starters, they have become too accustom to humans and would have to learn how to hunt. Sam, on the other hand, would probably have figured it out pretty quickly. Sam may not have been the most well-known ocelot at Carolina Tiger Rescue but he stole the hearts of those who did know him.  Sam’s Passing January 21, 2018 Sam’s last blood work left us concerned about his kidneys. The elevated levels indicated that he was starting into kidney failure. Kidney failure is a tricky disease for our wild cats. The ideal way to treat kidney failure is through administering fluids...

Caracals

Home»Uncategorized»   Carolina Tiger Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit wildlife sanctuary whose mission is saving and protecting wild cats in captivity and in the wild.   In Africa, Caracals are known as “Little Lions” due to their fierce and spunky demeanor. They pack a big punch in their small bodies! Caracals stand out in the feline family due to many interesting characteristics. Caracals sport long tufts of hair on their ears,  are excellent jumpers considering their body size, and are extremely strong! Caracals are capable of taking down prey three times their size! The long tufts of hair on the caracal’s ears are somewhat of a mystery, but scientists have a couple theories. One is to actually attract birds, their favorite prey. They sit in the tall grasses and flick the tops of their ears, fooling birds into thinking they are insects, causing them to come down closer, making them easier to catch! Caracals are considered crepuscular, meaning they are most active at dawn and dusk.   Caracals are excellent jumpers and can jump up to 13 feet in the air! Wild Caracals Though caracals are not considered endangered, their numbers are decreasing due to habitat loss. Caracals are sometimes poached by farmers if they are thought to have killed livestock. Caracal is a Turkish word meaning “Black-Eared.” Caracals love hunting guinea foul, a ground dwelling bird that makes easy prey for the cats. Learn More Caracals are considered small cats for many reasons: they purr instead of roar, they have larger back legs than front legs to help them make high leaps. Caracals help keep down the rodent and...