Santana was born at Carolina Tiger Rescue as part of our former breeding program.  He was a rambunctious, headstrong, and vivacious kitten, who matured into an elegant, athletic serval.  Santana, like all servals, is an excellent jumper.  He loves bounding around his enclosure and loved chasing his old neighbor, Aria Tiger, along the fence line.  Santana also finds joy in pouncing on unsuspecting leaves and sticks and playing in his water dish.  Occasionally, Santana will take a swipe at the vultures that come just a little too close to his enclosure to remind them that it is his territory and not theirs!

Born April 28, 2003

How Santana Came to the Sanctuary

Santana was born as part of Carolina Tiger Rescue’s former breeding program. Carolina Tiger Rescue, formerly Carnivore Preservation Trust, was originally founded to breed keystone species in hopes of one day releasing them into a safe environment but that day never came. Our animals who were born here will remain here for the rest of their lives.

Personality

Santana loves to catch snakes and rodents that wander into his enclosure and he has a history of pestering vultures that get a little too close.

Description

Santana was a rambunctious, headstrong, vivacious kitten who matured into an elegant, athletic serval. All servals are exceptional jumpers and Santana loves to go on intense bounding fits around his spacious enclosure. He also finds great joy in pouncing on unsuspecting leaves and sticks and spending serious time playing in his water dish. Santana has a world-class purr for those lucky enough to hear it.

Where in Sanctuary

Santana lives off the tour path in the Elm Grove area of the sanctuary. He is flanked by Tio Tiger's enclosure on one side and Macano Coatimundi's on the other.

Breeding

In the late 1990s, Carolina Tiger Rescue, formerly Carnivore Preservation Trust, decided to no longer breed due to the number of accredited facilities that were abiding by the Species Survival Plan. The Species Survival Plan was set up to ensure that breeding in captivity is only being done to conserve a species. This helps limit needless breeding and helps prevent a surplus of animals living in captivity. Carolina Tiger Rescue only supports breeding in captivity if it is done in accordance with the Species Survival Plan.

Leptailurus serval