Mary Stewart was born at Carolina Tiger Rescue as part of our former breeding program. Mary Stewart is a very spirited caracal who loves to stalk guests and volunteers while hiding in the tall grass at the front of her enclosure, illustrating how stealthy caracals can be. Mary Stewart has a very sweet, almost doll-like, face and a tawny-colored coat that lulls you into a false belief that she is cute and cuddly but she, like any caracal, is a fierce predator and not an animal to take lightly.

Born April 23, 1999

How Mary Stewart Came to the Sanctuary

Mary Stewart was born at Carolina Tiger Rescue as part of the former breeding program. Carolina Tiger Rescue started in the late 1970’s as Carnivore Preservation Trust, with the goal of breeding keystone species, such as caracals, to one day release them back into their natural habitats when it was safe to do so. When other AZA accredited facilities began breeding in accordance with the Species Survival Plan, Carnivore Preservation Trust turned its focus to rescuing. Animals who were born here will live out their lives at Carolina Tiger Rescue.

Personality

Mary Stewart has a very feisty and spirited personality. She loves to sneak up on guests and keepers by staying low in the grass and watching very discreetly from her hiding spot.  When she is found, she stands up and hopes for a treat.  However, due to her aggressive nature, Mary Stewart is currently off the treat list.

Description

Mary Stewart is a petite caracal with tufts of hair that stick straight up on the top of her ears. She weighs around 20 pounds. Female caracals are typically smaller than their male counterparts. 

Where in Sanctuary

Mary Stewart is located on Sweet Gum Trail, across from the three lions and next to Simon Serval.

Species Survival Plan

In the late 1990's, Carolina Tiger Rescue, formally Carnivore Preservation Trust, decided that we would stop breeding due to the number of accredited facilities that were abiding by the Species Survival Plan. The Species Survival Plan was set up to ensure that breeding in captivity was only being done to conserve a species. This helped limit needless breeding and prevents a surplus of animals living in captivity. Carolina Tiger Rescue only supports breeding in captivity if it is done in accordance with the Species Survival Plan.

Caracal caracal